News

For all the latest news from the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience

  • Fri 21st September 2018

    Dr. Stuphorn Finds Brain Center Linked to High-Risk Behavior

    GAMBLING MONKEYS LIKE BIG BETS, STUDY FINDS

    Scientists locate area of brain linked to high-risk behavior, a possible step toward improved treatments for destructively risky behaviors in humans
    Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one's willingness to make risky decisions.

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  • Thu 20th September 2018

    Dr. Dölen Publishes Study Suggesting Octopuses Moods are Influenced by drug Ectasy

    By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or “ecstasy,” scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

    A summary of the experiments is published Sept. 20 in Current Biology, and if the findings are validated, the researchers say, they may open opportunities for accurately studying the impact of psychiatric drug therapies in many animals distantly related to people. 

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  • Mon 17th September 2018

    Dr. Michela Gallagher awarded 2018 Melvin R. Goodes Prize for Excellence in Alzheimer's Drug Discovery

    Dr. Michela Gallagher has been awarded the 2018 Melvin R. Goodes Prize for Excellence in Alzheimer's Drug Discovery. The prize, awarded by the Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation, recognizes leading researchers developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.

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  • Wed 5th September 2018

    Goodman Young Scholar Award Winners

    Congratulations to Travis Babola and Kevin Monk who were selected as Robert R. Goodman MD PhD Young Scholar Award Winners!  This Award honors neuroscience training program students for their impressive contributions to our scientific community.

     

     

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